Youtube Star Brandon Rogers

Youtube Star Brandon Rogers

Brandon Rogers: Brandon Rogers is an American YouTuber, comedian, actor, and director. Rogers is commonly associated with his satirical videos on YouTube, in which he plays various intertwined and comedic characters. Rogers’ first job was creating videos for a personal injury law firm in Los Angeles.

Rogers’ first job was creating videos for a personal injury law firm in Los Angeles. After three years, he and his cameraman satirized the videos, posting them publicly to YouTube. Rogers had also worked at a hotel for 6 years, but like the 10 years worth of videos he had uploaded to YouTube before, they failed to gain traction. His channel remained relatively obscure until a fan began to upload 6-second clips of his videos to the now-defunct Vine platform, which in return pushed traffic to his channel.

Youtube Star Brandon Rogers

Brandon Rogers Agt

His particular brand of humor may not be suited for the likes of Oakley’s teenage fanbase, but Rogers has managed to carve out a niche, yet vast audience. His satirical stance exploits the stereotypes that plague our society, while making fun of every group without discrimination. Although some might find it offensive, he promises an unbiased comedic experience in an era that demands a political message with every piece of artistic expression.

We recently caught up with Rogers, following his win at this year’s Streamy Awards. Just off his first comedy tour, he’s hard at work on a brand-new podcast while continuing to make the unabashedly hilarious video content he’s known for. He spoke about American comedy, queer characters, and his recent coming out.

As the social media generation continues to push for LGBTQ visibility, YouTube has steadily become a saturated platform for young voices and talents. Queer kids have found role models in the likes of self-starters Tyler Oakley, Hannah Hart, and Todrick Hall, among others.

But one name that’s breaking through that uplifting queer mold of the “It Gets Better” generation is Brandon Rogers. You might recognize him from videos like “Things All Gays Say” and “Mother Making a Difference.” He portrays a diverse range of characters with zero shame.

Brandon Rogers America’s Got Talent

Brandon Rogers America’s Got Talent

His particular brand of humor may not be suited for the likes of Oakley’s teenage fanbase, but Rogers has managed to carve out a niche, yet vast audience. His satirical stance exploits the stereotypes that plague our society, while making fun of every group without discrimination. Although some might find it offensive, he promises an unbiased comedic experience in an era that demands a political message with every piece of artistic expression.

We recently caught up with Rogers, following his win at this year’s Streamy Awards. Just off his first comedy tour, he’s hard at work on a brand-new podcast while continuing to make the unabashedly hilarious video content he’s known for. He spoke about American comedy, queer characters, and his recent coming out.

It was amazing. Three years ago, it wouldn’t have meant anything to me. I was so removed from the internet world and had no idea what the Streamy’s even was. It is quite coveted, it’s like the Oscars. People in the industry take it very seriously, which I didn’t expect going into this. But this is my second Streamy win, and I’m very honored because I know most YouTubers don’t even get one, let alone two. I never thought that I would get a comedy. Comedy is such a big category. It’s really the only category I wanted to be nominated for last year.

Dr Brandon Rogers

Rogers, who has 5.32M subscribers on YouTube, is the third digital star to join forces with Comedy Central in this capacity. The network launched Under the Influencer in July, when its website and YouTube, FacebookTwitter, and Instagram accounts were taken over for one week by YouTube comedian Gus Johnson, and it continued the venture last month with a takeover starring fellow funny YouTuber CalebCity. (Both Johnson and CalebCity, by the way, are also nominated for comedy awards at this year’s Streamys.) Together, Johnson’s 49 pieces of video content and CalebCity’s 32 pieces brought 20.5M total views across platforms, and 14.1M minutes of watch time on YouTube alone.

Now, it’s Rogers’ turn.

He’ll bring his comedy sketch skills to the 36 videos for the network and its various franchises, including installments of short mockumentary series Mini-Mocks (in which Rogers plays a “shower drain hair artist”), Your Worst Fears Confirmed (in which he investigates just how much the government knows about what you look up when you’re browsing incognito), and That’s An App, which chronicles the worst apps that never existed — including Rogers’ DickFix.

“I play a handful of estranged characters, so the vibe is very similar to my videos,” Rogers tells Tubefilter. “Just with a bigger budget, a more organized production, and much better food!”

He adds, “I’m so used to directing, writing, and producing my own content, it’s a nice change to show up on set and only need to worry about acting when everything else is already taken care of. I think it’s a milestone in every comedian’s career to say they’ve collaborated with Comedy Central at some point, and I’m beyond thrilled to finally be here!”

“We’re thrilled to have the incredibly funny and talented Brandon Rogers join our Under the Influencer campaign,” Lesley Robin, Comedy Central’s VP of social media strategy, says. “Digital originals are an increasingly successful part of Comedy Central’s digital business, driving views and engagement for us. As we continue to invest in original content, Under the Influencer campaign is an amazing way to showcase new voices for our audience, while also bringing new fans into our feeds. We’re so excited to launch Brandon’s content and look forward to evening more partnerships in the coming months.”

You can check out Rogers’ shower hair artistry below, and keep an eye on the network’s website and various social media channels throughout this week to catch the rest of Rogers’ takeover.

Brandon Rogers Youtube

I think my process is just a lot of eating and shitting. I like to watch a lot of TVs. I love to watch a lot of comedy. I go on YouTube, and I watch so much garbage that I have a very distinct taste of what I would want if I was a viewer. Because as a kid, I’ve always been fascinated by the world of fiction on television, at the movies, and so I really feel like the more you ingest that world of make-believe, the more you feel almost instinctively able to recreate it through film. Whatever I’m watching, I start shooting stuff in the vein of what I’ve been inspired by, what I’ve been eating up. I love comedians like Chris Lilley or Matt Lucas or Sacha Baron Cohen, really just any comedian who isn’t American. I love the ability to be a chameleon and making people laugh because it’s all coming from you and your sense of humor, but the characters are like different Instagram filters through which you can dispense that humor. So, I use the different characters as a way to satire that demographic that they come from, and I feel like I just don’t see a lot of that in American comedy, certainly not on YouTube.

You also play on some stereotypes. Have you gotten any backlash for that satirical style of humor?

Not really. I really thought I would. The world is a tricky place because it seems like we’re much more easily offended today, more than ever. But I feel like my videos are just so over the top, you really can’t begin to take them seriously. I hope that they’re a refreshing change in this very stilted and kind of walking-on-eggshells society that we’ve become recently. I make sure to poke fun in every direction. I myself am racially, religiously, and sexually ambiguous. No one really knows what I am. I’m not really committed to a heritage that I’m proud of or a people that I represent. I’m very much made up of many ethnicities. I’ve been many religions in my lifetime, and I’ve been many sexualities. So, I don’t feel any bias in any direction of the minority spectrum. Really, nothing offends me, and I’m not in allegiance with any group. So, I think people can sense that — or at least I hope they do —that my videos come with no message or no political side, that they’re just comedy for the sake of comedy. Because I’m really not that passionate about representing any type of people or belittling any type of people. They’re all just kind of equal to me.

Here’s the thing about political humor. People say, “How do you get away with being so offensive and not getting backlash?” Well, even the best political humor comes with a message. You can still tell what the writer’s political stance is based on the writing. And I don’t like having anyone be able to decide what side of the fence I’m sitting on any topic when I write a comedic video. My videos are strictly meant to poke fun at the surface value of any person, place, or thing. I think it’s necessary to have some humor that doesn’t have a message. I feel like most humor we see has a message behind it, and some people like that. Some people like to go to the movies and have their morals spit back at them, but it’s really quite repulsive for people who aren’t on the same side as you. I don’t like that being a factor that might turn people off my work if they can see what my opinions are through the topic that I’m writing. There are enough comedians out there who have their opinions stated very clearly through their work. I take pride in being a comedian who strictly goes for laughs and really not much more.

Where is Brandon Rogers?

Brandon Rogers was born on August 3, 1988. He was born in Hayward, California, but thinks of Livermore, California as his hometown. He has since moved to an apartment block in Los Angeles. His family is from Australia.

How many subscribers does Brandon Rogers have?

4.5 million subscribers

Brandon Rogers is a YouTube star with 4.5 million subscribers who was nominated for a Streamy Award for Comedy on Tuesday, but his road to success has not been easy.

Who plays Lady Mingeworthy?

Portrayed by

Lady Mingeworthy is the wife of Lord Mingeworthy and the mother of Cockwaddle and James. She appears in “Normal British People” and “Halloween Therapy.”